Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the crystalline lens inside your eye loses its flexibility. This results in difficulty in focusing on close objects. Although presbyopia may seem to develop suddenly, the actual decline takes place over the course of many years.

Presbyopia

At what age does presbyopia occur?

The age at which presbyopia starts vary from person to person. Although presbyopia may seem to develop suddenly, the actual decline takes place over the course of many years. Presbyopia usually becomes apparent to people in their early to mid-forties, initially resulting in difficulty seeing very fine print up close or in poor lighting. The changes in the lens continue to progress until the late 40s, early 50’s, to a point at which objects within arm’s reach cannot be viewed clearly without reading glasses.

What are signs and symptoms of presbyopia?

Common signs/symptoms of presbyopia include the tendency to hold reading materials at arm’s length, blurred vision at normal reading distance, and eye fatigue along with headaches when attempting to do close work.

Why are frequent lens changes necessary after 40?

The effects of presbyopia gradually change the ability of the crystalline lens to focus properly. From start to finish, this usually occurs over a ten year period. As a result, approximately every two years, changes in your eyewear are necessary to maintain correct vision between ages 40 to 55.

Presbyopia is a natural part of the aging process and cannot be prevented or cured. A comprehensive eye examination by your eyeDOCS optometrist will determine the quality of your near vision.

To compensate for presbyopia, your optometrist may prescribe reading glasses, bifocals, progressives, or contact lenses.